A Whole New 318…it’s all in the details

This past week, we’ve re-worked our space at The Hudson Mercantile

store at 318 Warren Street and we love the new look. I started with my

little display window that hangs on the wall outside the store…..

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And moved on to the inside…..

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I love my cowboy, the Ford truck “wings”, the cupboard front, the ship’s hatch

in the perfect shade of blue….oh, I guess I just love it all…..

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The cabinet (below) is from the attic of the Lunt Silver Company and was used to

store samples. The wonderful primitive chaise is still strung with old rope and its

cozy cushion is rustic vintage hand woven linen.

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The pink baker’s cabinet, old general store screen door and the bear

really make my heart sing. I always keep the stores stocked with a

customer favorite, chunky French lavender bags.

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This large wood and metal flower-shaped piece (below)  is a factory mold.

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The tin foot bath, in old green paint, makes another intriguing wall

piece.

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Cupboards, rail road carts, work tables….they sure are wonderful, not

just for their good looks but because you can show off so much stuff:

collections of English jam jars, 1940s lunch boxes, hand made wine

cups…..

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Another customer favorite is my custom down bed pillows with zippered

ticking covers, specially made for me by my upholsterer. Since ticking is a

neutral, many people buy them for their sofas, as well.  I’m crazy about the

color and graphics on the 1930s French sign, advertising Normandie Biscuits.

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It’s a lot of work to keep things fresh but, at the end of the day, the satisfaction

and pleasure I get when I look at what I’ve done, is worth every minute of lifting

and climbing up and down the ladder and running outside to check how things

look through the window. They say that it is all in the details and I know that is

so. But, for me, I don’t want those details sitting around too long in one place!

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Please visit both of our stores…

The Hudson Mercantile:

318 Warren Street and 202 Allen Street (corner of 2nd Street) in

Hudson, New york.

We’re open every day and we promise fresh, exciting details every day, too!

Word!

When I look at photos from The Hudson Mercantile, I spot themes that continue
from one year to the next. Things with writing on them have always struck my fancy and
the pair of factory doors, the men’s department door, the ice bag and the Hudson’s Soap
doggy dish are no exceptions. I don’t know if it is because I really love to read and write
words or if there is something about the visual effect of them that pleases me so much.
These packages, books shipped in the 1940s, which sat, unopened til now in a warehouse in
Chicago, were just too good to pass up. The waxed brown paper, creamy twine, the old
stamps and…again!…the writing. On either side of the books are a toss game and a parade
banner. More words! Do other people notice that they are everywhere?
A close up of the beautiful penmanship…..
I guess I wouldn’t have been so enthralled with this folksy cupboard without its assertion
to “Keep Out”!
I had two of these “Old Home Day” banners (below), one for upholstering the back of a sofa,
the other to sell “as is”. The banners always made me think of childhood picnics, fireflies
and dropping off the tire swing over the river that ran through my parent’s friend’s place
in the country.
The European rail road signs (below) let us know what to do using symbols
rather than words. That’s a good thing in a situation where many different
languages are spoken. But, while I love them and think they are fun, they
don’t do it for me the way the contractor’s sign behind them does.
Words have a power over us, they tell us what to do and where to go. They
inform us and make us feel. As soon as I was born, my mother started reading
to me. Maybe when I see words now, something deep within me remembers
gazing upon the pages as I listened to her magical voice. It’s something to think
about anyway.

What’s New In The Hudson Supermarket?

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MORE SPACE = MORE FUN.
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That’s what I keep telling myself as I gobble up more and more space in the world’s
most super market, the Hudson Supermarket.
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I love it here. I wouldn’t want to be anywhere else.
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And even though I have just added on again, I still look past my now-very-long run
of booths and see how much more stuff I could put in here if I only had just another
30 or 100 feet.
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I could have more factory cart furniture. I’ve been making upholstered seating from
carts for more than 10 years and I never get tired of them. I don’t have one myself
because I  have to replace these faster than I can have the upholstery completed. But,
someday….
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I could have more chickens!

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And, more of the world’s largest flags.
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More French chaises. This one is upholstered in a vintage heavy linen, embroidered
French sheet, natch.
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There would be room for more deconstructed American chaises. This one
started out as a fainting couch…covered in that  fancy-schmancy shiny stuff,
stuffed with uncomfortable horsehair. It had one of those upholstered curved
things (to keep fair maidens from toppling as they fainted dead away, I
suppose) along what is now just an open side. The thick, hand woven linen
and piles of down invite cat naps and other activities that don’t necessarily
require passing out.
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And, another few Frenchy day dream daybeds.
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I designed the pair of fireside benches (the frames are built from the ground
up) and had them upholstered in the most beautiful ca 1900 Swedish drop
cloth material, complete with all the markings and fantastic hand worked
repairs and patches.
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They’ve already been copied by a well-known retailer. Whom I shall not
name.
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Their mass-produced fabric is unusual and really wonderful.
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But not as nice as mine!
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The 1930s steamer chair is upholstered in the last of the drop cloth material.
The grommets, old rope and other parts of the drop cloths are left intact and
look  incredible….so there, big international retailer!
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I really like small stuff, but only if it is old and different from the run of the
mill things that are everywhere. These jars, new-old stock with wonderful
labels, are sure to be reproduced and will show up in a retail store near you
very soon!
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These fabric sample books, ranging from 1887 to 1912, are loaded with
pieces of wool and the most wonderful old hand-written notations and
labels. They are real treasures and are hard for me, a lover of textiles, to
let go. The wavy pages of the book in the middle of the table is like art to
me and, thus, even though it is the newest, is my favorite.
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Other textiles, samples of linen and cotton duck.
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And an old artist’s apron.
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Piles and piles of old bags…
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of all different kinds.
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I have dozens of old Swiss Army bread bags, perfect for slinging
over a shoulder. The leather loops were meant to hang on the handles
of a bicycle.
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Canvas of all kinds gives me a thrill! The thermos cover is full of buckles
and ties and do-dads, including the owner’s initials.
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In a departure from my mostly masculine look, I couldn’t resist a load of pretty
1920s-40s lingerie and jewelry bags from a stone house in Vermont.
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Old advertising, there’s nothing like it anymore. Here, a heavy paper
electric light! I wonder if anyone really believed that the Easy Washer
and the Easy Ironer were  easy?
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 A 1950s paint bucket! I love the embossed numbers and the
happy housewife.
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Even old oil cans looked better back then.
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The window at my post office is nowhere near as good looking as this one
with its gilded lettering, patterned glass and lack of junk mail.
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I have a hundred cultivator parts that make perfect little shelves now that
their farmer has gone modern. The 1937 orange paper “license plates” in
the chrome holders are fillers, merely meant to show how they would look
on a brand new Chevy.
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A see-saw turned bench. Something fun for a front porch.
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A pair of 1800s iron rabbits.
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And a mid century papier mache panda.  Animals. Still the loves of my life.
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But, best of all, paintings by my friend and the greatest living artist,

Jennifer Lanne (JenniferLanne.com). This 6 foot x 6 foot depiction

of country life is the way we would all like it to be.  As much as I would

like to keep it for myself, I have it on 1st Dibs for all the world to see.

(1stdibs.com  >   click “Hudson” in the “Cities” column on the right  >

type “Stephanie Lloyd” in “keyword search” on left.

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I think this one is my favorite with its farm animals, barn, baskets and view.
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But what about this one? The color! The sheep! Is that a Swedish drop cloth
I see on the chair? Picking a favorite is hard for all of us. We really just want
it all. In the end, I guess it comes down to space. We always need just that
extra 30 or 100 extra feet.
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All photos and written materials are the legal property of Stephanie Lloyd
and Stephanie Lloyd At The Hudson Supermarket.  Please do not copy,
reproduce or in any way use without express written permission.

Who’s Interested?

We were headed down a country road on the way to Vermont the other day and
spotted this gang of sheep seeking shelter under a tree from a storm that was
definitely headed our way.
One little renegade left the flock and ran to see what what we were all about.

He was just like a wooly stuffed animal and it was so hard to get back in the
truck and leave him behind.
I looked back and saw his mother (or some other sheep in authority) coming to
fetch him back into the fold.  The storms were brutal that day and I was glad
to think of him warm and dry under the wide branches of that tree.

Another Year…

 

Another year, another baby…

This darling newborn (above) belongs to the mother with the red tack.  A second
one (below) belongs to the horse with the blue tack.
They put on a nice little show for us and didn’t seem to mind my camera at all.  We were
lucky again this year to be in the right place at the right time and look forward to
seeing the little ones grow.

“What Are Those Things?”

A customer came here the other day, a set decorator I’ll call D, who I really like

a lot. She was looking for mostly workbenches and industrial pieces for an up-

coming movie she is designing.  She brought her friend along, another set designer

from California, who I will call S.  After my house, they were continuing on to the

Finger Lakes where they both have family. 

As we wandered through the house, on the off-chance that something for the movie

was lurking around inside, S asked “what are all those things you have everywhere?

I love them!” 

  They were, of course, grain sacks.

But why had she never seen grain sacks before?  A set designer! From California!

Well, she just hadn’t!  But, now that she had made this miraculous discovery, she

wanted two for some chairs.  So, while D and Ken went out to the barns to check

out the big stuff, S and I went to work picking out the two very best sacks in the

bunch.

This was no easy task given the hundreds of choices and, at some point, S said  “I

wish you only had two!”   We started with the new-old stock (like the ones above),

which most people who are new to grain sacks prefer for its less well-worn presence. 

      

And, graduated quickly to the old-old sacks.  S is a set decorator, from California,

after all, and was thrilled with the old hand-worked repairs, the darnings and

patches that I love.

    

We tried different ones on the back a chair,  made piles on the floor and, in what

felt like no time ’cause I was having such fun,  found the perfect two. 

Customers always offer to help put the grain sacks back on the shelves and I always

decline.  There’s nothing more relaxing than being alone with my grain sacks, folding,

stacking on the correct shelves : wreathes with wreathes, plows with plows. A bonus

that day was finding Mitten, sound asleep and not even pretending to help. I guess I’m

not the only one who relaxes around grain sacks.

Three Out Of Five Ain’t Bad

Early last week, we went to see a picker in the Adirondacks

who had called us about a table with beefy legs and a work bench

that he thought we would like.  We took the long way (no highways

allowed!) which took us past so many old Greek Revivals, barns

and churches in various states of repair. We passed through

Saratoga and Lake George with no complaints. The picker’s house is

high on a hill in the woods. Here are five things we saw in the tall

grass…

The beefy table!

The workbench!

The snake!

Another workbench sitting on his truck!

A chops-licking kitty!  Where did that snake go?

We only brought home three of out the five things we saw.  While we

greatly admired the other two, it seemed best to let them stay behind

in their Adirondack home.

What I Wish I Did At Brimfield

—This is the end of another incredible week of doing what we love in one of

our favorite places, Brimfield.  And, as usual,  there is only one thing that I

wish I had been able to do…take photos of the beautiful, the outlandish and

the wonderful things I saw. Continue reading